How It Works

 Speedwrite In 90 Seconds (Video)


  Copy

  • Start at any Wikipedia page.
  • CTRL+A to select all the text.
  • CTRL+C to copy all the text.
  • Log into Speedwrite.
  • CTRL+V to paste all the Wikipedia text.

  Predict

  • Hover over a paragraph with your mouse.
  • Click the blue button to predict.

  Correct

  • Speedwrite predictions may contain errors.
  • Fix grammatical and factual errors before exporting text.

Speedwrite: What You Need To Know

Get better predictions  


 Choose the right sources (video)


 Split long paragraphs

To get the best predictions, edit your input paragraphs so that they are simple.

Very long paragraphs won't make good predictions.

Before you predict, break up very long paragraphs so they are shorter.

Each paragraph should be "about" just one concept.

 Paragraph helpers

If your paragraph is too long, or if your text has too many line breaks, try the "Split paragraph" or "Lines ⇨ paragraphs" button.

 Computers only

Speedwrite works well on any computer.

You can use   Windows,  Mac,  Linux, or  Chromebook.

Speedwrite does not work on mobile phones, tablets, or televisions.

 Export any time

Easily export a text file or copy your entire document to the clipboard. Speedwrite has no limits on exports.

 Add a title before predicting

A title helps Speedwrite understand what you are writing about. Add a complete title before you predict text. Your title should include the name of the thing you are writing about, like "Icebreakers", or "Cats", or "The European Union." You can add a title at the top of your screen.

 Use multiple Wikipedia pages

Your predictions will be better if you use multiple Wikipedia pages. For example, if you are writing about "icebreakers," in addition to copying test from the Wikipedia entry on icebreakers, copy some paragraphs from the page on sea ice and the page on nuclear powered icebreakers, and make predictions from a combination of those texts.

  Always check facts

Usually Speedwrite will maintain the correctness of facts in source text, but not always. In some cases, especially with long or complex source paragraphs, Speedwrite may produce unexpected results: It may change dates, names, or other simple facts, or simply misinterpret meaning from a source paragraph. It's your responsibility to check for, and fix, these errors, before exporting your predictions from Speedwrite.

If you are finding factual problems with predictions, please ensure you are splitting paragraphs before prediction: See split long paragraphs, above.

 Is it free?

Speedwrite uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence, and is expensive to run. Each time you make a prediction, our computer systems have to perform a number of complex and computationally intensive tasks. We therefore do need users who want to actively use the system to subscribe to one of our monthly plans.

When you sign up for Speedwrite, your account is granted a pre-set number of free predictions. You may see how many predictions you have remaining when you are a logged in, using the "Subscriptions" link on the top of this page. When you run out of predictions, you may subscribe to one our monthly plans to get more predictions.

All other functionality in Speedwrite is free, including all text imports and exports. If you run out of predictions, you will continue to maintain free access to your existing predictions, documents, and sources, for the lifespan of this application, according to our terms of service, detailed below.


Speedwrite: For Scientists Only

Learn how the magic works


 Tips for power users (video)

 Is it randomized?

This is subtle. If you create multiple predictions from the same paragraph of text, you will find that in some cases, unique texts are generated each time, and in other cases, the same, or similar, text may be predicted. Speedwrite's predictions are not guaranteed to be unique, however, over a sufficiently long period of time -- say, two to three weeks, you should assume that predictions will be unique and not repeat.

This is best illustrated with an example. Given the source text:

An icebreaker is a special-purpose ship or boat designed to move and navigate through ice-covered waters, and provide safe waterways for other boats and ships. Although the term usually refers to ice-breaking ships, it may also refer to smaller vessels, such as the icebreaking boats that were once used on the canals of the United Kingdom.

We found that with three successive predictions, we generated these texts:

An icebreaker is a boat or ship that is designed to move through ice-covered waters. It provides safe routes for other vessels and ships.

An icebreaker is a boat that helps ships navigate through ice-covered waters. It is usually used to move cargo and supplies through ice.

An icebreaker is a ship or boat that helps move through ice-covered waters. It is typically designed to provide safe passage for other boats and ships.

These texts are unique, however, continued prediction of this source paragraph will eventually yield repetitive predictions, which are not unique. You should be able to test this behavior yourself, and note that, if you make enough predictions from the same source text, eventually you start to see duplicates.

However, if you come back to Speedwrite later, say, in two to three weeks, you should find that the same source text actually produces a totally different set of predictions. This will be because the Speedwrite's prediction engine is changing gradually over time. It changes a little bit each day, and the changes, in aggregate, should be noticable over the course of a few weeks.

 Are predictions unique text?

So far, our tests have indicated that Speedwrite predictions do pass tests such as those offered by Grammarly, and Unicheck. Please try to generate some predictions yourself, and test them with one of these services, and report your findings on our forum.

 Watch out for fake plagiarism warnings in "free" Grammarly accounts

Note that if you have a "free", or unpaid Grammarly account, Grammarly will show fake plagiarism warnings. For example, for this text:

Halloween or Hallowe'en is celebrated on October 31st, and it is associated with the Western Christian feast of All Saints' Eve. This day is also known as All Hallows' Eve. One theory states that the origins of Halloween's traditions can be traced back to Samhain, which was a Celtic festival. Some scholars believe that Samhain was Christianized as an All Hallow's Day celebration. Activities on Halloween include trick-or-treating, attending costume parties, lighting bonfires, visiting haunted attractions, and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, Christians also attend services and candle lighting on the graves of the deceased. Halloween or Hallowe'en dates back to 1745, and it is derived from the Christian word for Saint's evening. This word is derived from a word that translates to "eve". In Scots, the phrase "All Hallows' Eve" is translated to "eve". According to folklorist Jack Santino, the origins of Halloween can be traced back to the beliefs and customs of some Celtic countries, which are believed to have pagan origins. Samhain, which was the first and most important day of the medieval Gaelic calendar, was celebrated on October 31 in Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man. It was held at the same time as a kindred festival held by the Bretons and Welsh Celts.

If you enter that into a free Grammarly account, you will see this warning:

Note that this warning is fake and is an attempt to confuse you, to get you to sign up for a paid Grammarly account. If you do sign up for the paid account, and run the same text again, you'll see a very low match score, and in fact Grammarly is unable to determine the source of the text.

 Can it be detected?

So far, we haven't found a way that text created with Speedwrite could be "reverse engineered," or somehow identified as "predicted with Speedwrite." If you find a way, please report your findings on our forum.

 Is this artificial intelligence?

Yep.

 Sources, Documents & Backups

Sources are empty containers where can you paste creative commons text. Sources are saved in your browser only. If you open Speedwrite on a different computer, sources saved on other computers will not appear. Note that Speedwrite does not save your sources on our servers.

Documents are where your predictions will appear. You can freely edit documents, and you can export a document to a text file or to your computer clipboard at any time.

As you work, your current document is saved periodically, on an automatic basis. Each save point is available as a Backup, which can be restored at any time.

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